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"Only the darkness 
brings out the light" 



The Hornet's Flight 



"Not how much 
but how well" 



"HEIGHTS BY GREAT MEN REACHED AND KEPT, WERE NOT ATTAINED BY SUDDEN FLIGHT". 



VOL. 3 no. 3 Roosevelt Junior College, West Palm Beach, Florida December 1962 

THE LOVELY LENA PRICE 
CROWNED MISS RJC 




The Queen And Her Court 



planking the Queen, left to right are: Edith Williams and Brown Murph; Hattie Reed and J heron Dempsey; 
Gretchen Bush and Samuel Thomas; Lucy Timmons and Andy Brown; Elton Butler; Patricia Peterson and Donald 
Foxx; Betty Allen and Martez Sheffield; Gloria Sherman and Qothriel Lapleur; Tally talker and Edwin Lawson. 
Master Selmdre Lorenzo Haines, Jr., Crown Bearer; Charon Cooper and Sylvia Chanon Buie, Flower Girls. 

The stage ushers on lower level are Edwin VfMiams and- Joseph Kemp. 



As queenly as the crown was Miss Lena Price as she was 
honored i.n a glittering matchless ceremony on Friday night, De- 
cember 14- Miss Price became the 5th. queen in the history of 
the school. She was .crowned by RJC's first reigning queen, 
Mrs. Maxine Mitchell, who went on to graduate at Bethune Cook- 
man College, and who is now teaching at Lincoln Elementary 
School, in Riviera Beach. 

Miss Price wore a gorgeously beautiful white floor-length 
lace gown which was matched only by her charm and grace as 
she accepted the challenge of her glittering crown. 

The student body and the various interest groups showed 
their warm appreciation and honor to Miss Price by showering 
her with token^.gifts, and entertaining her with songs music, 
dancing and poetry. The orchestra — Donald Scott — played soft 



music throughout coronation exercises and honored the queen 
by playing a lovely waltz. 

Included in the Queen's court were eight charming young 
ladies wearing ballerina length evening gowns of lovely pastel 

shades. 

Patricia Peterson, who is Miss Freshman, and her escort, 
Donald Foxx; Lucy Timmons, sophomore attendant and her es- 
cort, Andy Smith; Gloria Tally and escort Edward Lawson; Edith 
Williams and escort, Naaman Grubbs; Betty G. Allen, and escort 
Edward Williams; Gretchen Bush and escort Samuel Thomas; 
Gloria Sherman and escort G°thriel LaFleur; and Hattie Reed and 
escort Thereon Dempsey. 

This gala affair terminated in a coronation ball with music 
furnished by the Donald Scott orchestra. 



THE HORNET'S FLIGHT 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief - Joyce Austin 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief -- Lucy Timmons 

Feature Editors - - -- Beverly Wise 

Mary Red dick 

Secretary --...... Albertha Williams 

Sports Editors --- Gothriel LaFluer 

Theorn Dempsey 

Exchange Editor Betty Go ldwire 

Reporter . . . _ . rj oria id p 030C 

This paper does not necessarily reflect the opinions and policies 
of the college administration, but those of the students. 



RJC Grad Inducted 
into Honor Society 



National & International Holidays 

THANKSGIVING - CHRISTMAS - NEff YEARS 

Thanksgiving is an annual festival of giving thanks for the 
mercies of the closing year. It is celebrated by prayers and 
feasting. In 1941, Congress passed a joint resolution setting a- 
side the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas is the most joyous, blessed day of the year. It 
is a time when Christians all over the world celebrate the birth- 
day of Jesus Christ. Today, Men, Women, and children in every 
Christian land crowd into churches to give thanks. 

The custom of distributing gifts, decorating trees, and sing- 
ing traditional songs called carols, all add beauty and fellow- 
ship to the Christmas season. 

The yuietide festival of celebrating the first day of the New 
Year is an old custom. It is called New Year's Day, and is a 
time for entertaining. Many people go to church while many go 
to parties to await the dawning of a new year. Thus, the New 
Year's se.ason is celebrated. 

Here's hoping everyone enjoys this yuietide festival. 

by Beverly Wise 



Our Queen 
Lena Price 

She who is 

By beauty possessed; 
She who is 

With talents blessed. 

She who is 

With charm endowed; 
She who makes 

Us ever proud. 

She who speaks 
With softest sound; 

She who proudly 
Wears her crown. 

She who sits 

Upon her throne 
And reigns better 

Than any known. 

She who does 
our wants suffice, 

Is this our queen, 
Miss Lena J. Price. 

To queen of queens 

AH hail to thee! 
Most precious asset 

ofR.J.C . 

For thee always 

Our banners will wave, 
To thee we offer 

Our warmest praise. 

by Betty J. Walker 



Officers Installed 



In installing officers for 
1962-63, Mr. B. Carlton Bryant, 
instructor in social studies, gave 
them both general and individual 
charges: 

"In the course of discharg- 
ing your duties, you are to wear 
with pride and humility, the 
badge of your respective of- 
fices. Proud that your fellow 
citizens recognized the lead- 
ership qualities in you and with 
humility, guide your fellow stu- 
dents up the accepted road to 
success morally, spiritually 
and educationally. 

"Freshmen, you are on the 
threshhold of a bright future. 
The experience gained here in 
carrying out your obligations is 
of primary importance in adjust- 
ing to your: role of a productive 
citizen in your college com- 
munity as well as in your home 
towns. 

"Sophomores, this is the 
second stage of successful 
flight coward becoming the 
leaders of tomorrow. Take your 
obligations and responsibilities 
seriously. 

"Officers of the Student 
Government Association, you 
carry positions of prestige that 
should not be abused. In our 
college community, you are the 
elected guides to your fellow 
students." 




The faculty and student 
body of RJC extend warm con- - 
gratulations to a former student, 
Eleanor Johnson, upon being 
inducted into the National Honor 
Society at Florida A. and M. 
University, Mrs. Johnson, who 
is majoring in social studies, 
has maintained a high scholastic 
average ever since her registra- 
tion at Florida A- and M- Uni- 
versity. 

Additional congratulations 
go to Mrs. Johnson for having 
been initiated into the Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority. 



Thanksgiving 
Thanks 

The students and faculty 
members of the Roosevelt Junior 
College participated whole- 
heartedly in contributing food 
items for Thanksgiving baskets, 
which were greatly needed and 
highly appreciated by neighbors 
in the community. 

Many thanks to the entire 
family for its splendid coopera- 
tion and concern for the less 
fortunate. 

by Betty Allen 



Faculty Front 

Dean Paul W- Butler served 

as a member of the evaluation 
committee at Northwestern Sen- 
ior High School in Miami in 
November. 

President B. G- Sayles and 
Dean P. W. Butler attended a 
meeting of the Florida Council 
of Institutions of Higher Learn- 
ing which was held in Ocala 
recently. 

Mrs. C. B. ; Bridwell at- 
tended the National Convention 
of the National Council of 
Teachers of English that met 
at the . Americana Hotel in 
Miami Beach on November 22" 
24- 

The Dean's Committee of 
the Florida Council of Institu- 
tions of Higher Learning will 
meet at Roosevelt Junior Col- 
lege on February 22, 1963- 
Deans and other representa- 
tives from Colleges in the 
State will attend this meeting. 



EDUCATION WEEK 

In observance of American 
Education Week, Thursday, No- 
vember 15, 1962, the students 
and faculty of RJC were grate- 
ful to have as guest speaker, 
Mrs. Olivia Baldwin, Supervisor 
of Schools in Palm Beach Coun- 

Her topic, "Lifelong Learn- 
ing Meets the Challenge of 
Change" was most enlightening 
and inspirational. It stimulated . 
our interest in the world today 
and made us aware of expecta- 
tions of us. 

In the course of her pre- 
sentation, she related the par- 
able of the little, bird who re- 
fused to use God's gift — fly- 
ing; thus the gift became a use- 
less one. Therefore, she charged 
us to make our plans, use wise- 
ly our time, and seek earnestly 
to accomplish our goal. 

Many thanks to Mrs. Bald- 
win. The address was indeed a 
challenge to all. 

by Doris Rodgers 



Cultural Log 



1. What is the name of the American who recently received the 
Pulitzer Prize for literature? 

2- The heavy-weight fighter who knocke.d out Archie Moore and 
brags that he's ready to "take on Liston. " 

3- Author of America, the Vincible, former speech writer for 
Eisenhower and retiring speech writer for Rockefeller? 

4- Name the U. S- Ambassador to the United Nations. 
Name the first American pilot to fly in outer space. 
Name of his ship. 

Name of the first Catholic president of U.S. 
Name of the head of the communist party in Russia. 
Name of the most recently appointed associate justice of 

the Supreme Court. 

10. Name of the Chief Justice of the U. S- Supreme Court. 

11. Name of the first Negro to officially attend University or Ole 
Mississippi. 

12- Name of first Negro Press Secretary to the President of the 

United States. 

L3. Name of Attorney General of the United States. 

14. Name of the Governor of Florida. 

15. Name of the newly elected Secretary to the United Nations. 

(The answers to this edition's Cultural Log will t>c W our next- 
issue of the HORNET'S FLIGHT. .-,. .■ .. . 



5- 

6- 
% 

8- 
9- 



The College Community Chorus in Concert 




The Roosevelt Junior Col- 
lege-Community Chorus presen- 
ted the fifth in a series of an- 
nual Christmas concerts, on Mon- 
day night, December 10, 1962- 
The community attended in large 
numbers and were warm in their 
response to the entire program. 

The special number ren- 
dered was "The Song of Christ- 
mas" by Roy Ringwald, with 
Miss Rachel Perry, English in- 
structor, narrating. Included also 
were excerpts from Handel's 
"Messiah" and a variety of 
familiar carols and solos. 

The featured soloists were: 
Alpha Brown, Mary Brown, Alma 
Hill, Dorothy Pugh, and Parlee 
Walker, sopranoes; Winifred 
Mims, alto; E- . M- Davis and 
John Mainor, tenors; L- S- Pugh, 
Jr., bass, and Jessie Jackson, 
bass-baritone. 

The concert was under the 
direction of Mr. Walter T- Locke 
who was accompanied by his 
wife, Mrs. Eunice B. Locke. 

Congratulations to Mr. 
Locke and chorus for a job well 
done. 



Sophomore 
Class 

by Frances Sweeting 

The members of the Sopho- 
more- Class are putting forth 
every effort toward achieving 
their year's goal. The class has 
agreed upon means of raising 
funds to strengthen its budget. 
One of the. projects voted upon 
is sale of hot dogs on campus 
every Monday, Tuesday, and 
Thursday. We are asking for the 
support of the entire student 
body and faculty members. With 
funds from our projects we hope 
to publish a representative year 
book. 



Congratulations 



Miss Betty Allen, vice 
president of the freshman class, 
and Miss Patricia Peterson, 
"Miss Freshman", who have 
been selected to work as fresh- 
man representatives with the 
Yearbook staff for 1962-63- 



Books That Changed 
The World 

by Robert B- Downs 
The civilization and cul- 
ture of modern man have been 
guided and shaped by the thought 
of a limited number of indivi- 
duals. Almost without excep- 
tion, these persons have ex- 
pressed themselves and spread 
their doctrines through the me- 
dium of the printed word. These 
books have turned the human 
mind into new channels, cre- 
ated new sciences or novel 
points of views, and have re- 
awakened an appreciation of 
ancient truths and traditions 
by appealing to the emotions 
and biases of the persons who 
read them. Countless number 
of persons have attempted to 
•name the books of greatest in- 
fluence, but to date, no list has 
carried less than five books. 
The following list is a good 
example of the type of books 
which appear on such lists. 
These books are in the R.J.C- 
Library and should be read by 
all interested persons. 
WEALTH OF NATIONS by 
Adam Smith is a temperate, 
thorough, and even engrossing 
analysis of the economic facts 
of life in a free industrial so- 
ciety. Its theme discloses the 
ideas that every human being 
is motivated primarily by self 
interest and that a nation's 
prosperity can best be pro- 
vided hy allowing the uniform, 
constant, and uninterrupted ef- 
forts of every man to better his 
condition. It is a masterpiece 
of its kind, and its influence 
on modem thought and prac- 
tice has been historically sig- 
nificant. 

ORIGIN OF THE SPECIES by 
Charles Darwin is a biological 
study that every educated per- 
son should read. For Darwin's 
report on his biological investi- 
gations have come to have far- 
reaching importance beyond the 
field of biology; the evidence 
he presented and the implica- 
tions and principles it evolved 
came eventually to influence 
psychology, sociology, law, 
theology, educational theory, 
philosophy, literature, and other 
branches of man's endeavor. 
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN by Har- 
riet Beecher Stowe is a story of 



slave life in the South before 
the Civil War. The scene is 
chiefly in Kentucky and Louisi- 
ana. When the Shelbys are forced 
to sell their slaves, the mulat- 
to girl Eliza and her child es- 
cape across a frozen river; but 
Uncle Tom, a christian slave, 
remains. He is sold after the 
death of his master to a brutal 
slave-dealer and after suffering 
grear cruelties dies. This book 
is one of the most popular books 
ever' written and, it has been 
translated into almost every 
civilized language. Too, it has 
been made into plays many 
times and has been acted in 
most of the principle cities of 
Europe and America. 
ESSAYS ON THE PRINCIPLE 
OF POPULATION by Thomas 
Mai thus is one of the greatest 
classics of political economy. 
In his essay, Malthus made an 
inquiry into the nature and causes 
of poverty. He revealed that 
population has a tendency to 
multiply faster than the means 
of supports, and that some peo- 
ple must necessarily go hungry 
unless society adopt measures 
to prevent the natural increase 
of the population. He will al- 
ways be remembered for his 
proposed cures. 

INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS 
by Sigmund Freud (theories 
which have exerted unrivaled 
influence on modern thought) , 
explore the unknown regions 
of the mind. In doing this, Freud 
formulated ideas and terms that 
have now become a part of our 
daily living. Virtually every 

field of knowledge literature, 

art, religion, anthropology, edu- 
cation, law, sociology, history, 
and other studies of society and 
the individual has felt the ef- 
fects of his teachings. More- 
over, because of Freud, people 
think very differently about 
themselves today. Consequently, 
these theories have exerted un- 
rivaled influence on modern 
thought. 

THE PRINCE by NiccotoMach- 
iavelli is an ingenious and fas- 
cinating study of the art of 
practical politics. It is a prac- 
tical guide book for princes (or 
as some have said, a manual for 
tyrants) to instruct them in how 
to gain and hold power, not for 
the ruler's sake, but for the 
good of the people. None of the 



Word Power 


appall 


custody 


wrest 


cherish 


counsel 


deluge 


guerdon 


brevity 


salvage 


esteem 


obsess 


chaos 


havoc 


redeem 



trick's and strategems that 
Machiavelli used were new. 
Separately, each can be found 
in earlier author's works. How- 
ever, Machiavelli brought them 
together with such artistry and 
such memorable phrasing that 
they have been associated with 
his name ever since. Few books 
have had more influence upon 
Western thought and action, and 
it is no wonder that Machiavelli 
was bestowed the legitimate 
title of "Founder of the Science 
of Politics. " 



Which of the list of words 
above offers the best answer to 
each question? 
1. Which word expresses the 

most respect? 

Which word recovers lost ' 

treasure? 

Which buys back or makes 

amends ? 
,4- Which consists of advice? 

5- Find a word which often in- 
volves courts or police. 

6- Find the word that horrifies. 

7. According to the Biblical 
account, for what did Noah 
prepare? 

8. Find the word that haunts 
a person. 

9- Which word denotes great 
damage? 
10- Which word expresses af- 
fection as well as respect? 

11. Which word describes a 
great disorder and confusion? 

12. Which word tells how a 
policeman twists a gun from 
a captured grasp? 



INFOIMAT 



The Hornet's Flight, ex- 
change editor, Miss Betty 6old- 
wire, has begun to send editions 
of our paper to other colleges 
in Florida. To keep up with 
events on other campuses, read 
the college newspapers that are 
now available in the library. 




The first dance culminating the crowning, was a number honor- 
ing the Queen and her Court. They danced as the audience remained 
seated. ^ 




Her Majesty steps down from her newly claimed throne, es- 
corted by Elton Butler, President of SGA- 



Etiquette in the Street 



Dress immaculately and suitably. 

Don't link arms on the sidewalk. 

Avoid pushing and jostling. 

Don]t point or stare. 

Don't talk or laugh too loudly. 

Be poised and avoid familiarity or any display of emotion. 

Boys walk nearest the curb between girls and the traffic. 

If there are two girls and a boy, his place is still on the out- 
side — although changing rules occasionally allow him the 
middle position. 

Boys take girls arms only when assistance is really needed. 

Girls speak first when they pass boys whom they know. 
11. Boys are expected to open doors, pick up dropped packages 
and offer seats to girls. They in turn, show a genuine ap- 
preciation by a smile and a "thank you." 



9- 

10. 





-Lena, RJC's Fifth Queen, is crowned by Mrs. Maxine tAitchell, 
RJC's First Queen. 



SPORTS COLUMN 



During a brief interview 
with coach Warren Hawkiris, he 
stated, "the Hornets were pro- 
gressing nicely. " Returning let- 
termen are: John Foster, Lenton 
Brown, Frank Matthews, Law- 
rence Miller, and Lester Bridges. 
The roster includes: Howard 
Ferguson,- Hawthorne Tew, 
Lester Bridges, Lenton Brown, 
Billy Rozier, George Franklin, : 
Frank Matthews, and Lawer- 
MiUer. 

There are several games 
to be played but there are no 
definite dates set as yet. The 
following teams are a part of 



the schedule for 1962-63. 

J.W- Johnson — Leesburg, Fla. 

Lincoln, — Ft. Pierce, Fla. 

Carver — Cocoa, Fla-- 

Gibbs — St. Petersburg, Fla. 

The coach also stated : that ~ ; 
the first home game will be 
played January 3, 1963- Our op- 
ponent will be Gibbs Junior 
College of St. Petersburg. 

The team is now making 
preparations for the invitational 
tournament which will be held 
in Ocala, Florida. Coach Haw- 
kins is asking full student sup- 
port at all games. 

by Gothriel LaFluer